Influenza-Associated Outcomes Among Pregnant, Postpartum, and Nonpregnant Women of Reproductive Age

By Namrata Prasad, Q Sue Huang, Tim Wood, Nayyereh Aminisani, Colin McArthur, Michael G Baker, Ruth Seeds, Mark G Thompson, Marc-Alain Widdowson, E Claire Newbern

 The Journal of Infectious Diseases, June 15, 2019.

 

 

Pregnant women are prioritized for seasonal influenza vaccination, but the evidence on the risk of influenza during pregnancy that is used to inform these policies is limited.

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Evidence for Cross-Protection Against Subsequent Febrile Respiratory Illness Episodes From Prior Infections by Different Viruses Among Singapore Military Recruits 2009–2014

By I-Cheng Mark Chen, Jin Phang Loh, Cheryl X P Chuah, Qiu Han Christine Gao, Yinxiaohe Sun, Sock Hoon Ng, Wee-Hong Victor Koh, Ee Hui Goh, Xiahong Zhao, Paul Anantharajah Tambyah Alex R Cook, Jeremiah Chng, Junxiong Pang, Boon-Huan Tan, Vernon J Lee

The Journal of Infectious Diseases, June 15, 2019.

 

 

Few studies have evaluated the relative cross-protection conferred by infection with different groups of viruses through studies of sequential infections in humans. We investigated the presence of short-lived relative cross-protection conferred by specific prior viral infections against subsequent febrile respiratory illness (FRI).

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Enterovirus D68 Causing Acute Respiratory Infection Clinical Characteristics and Differences With Acute Respiratory Infections Associated With Enterovirus Non-D68

By Milagrosa Montes, Eider Oñate, Ainhoa Muguruza, Esther Tamayo, Itxaso Marti Carrera, Ana Iturzaeta, Gustavo Cilla

The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, To be published July 2019

 

Enterovirus (EV) D68 is mainly associated with acute respiratory infection (ARI). Since 2014, when outbreaks in different countries were observed, this emerging virus was considered a potential threat to public health.

During 2015–2017, the presence of enterovirus RNA was investigated in all respiratory samples of children younger than 15 years of age with ARI, obtained for virologic studies in the Pediatric Emergency Care Units and wards of 2 hospitals in Gipuzkoa (Spain), using a commercial multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction. When enterovirus was detected, a polymerase chain reaction to amplify a specific viral polyprotein (VP1) gene region of EV-D68 was performed.

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The Clinical Presentation of Pediatric Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infections—A Single Center Cohort

By Oren Gordon, Yonatan Oster, Ayelet Michael-Gayego, Rachel Marans, Dina Averbuch, Dan Engelhard, Allon Moses, Ran Nir-Paz

The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, To be Published July 2019

 

Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP) is a major cause of community-acquired upper and lower respiratory infections in school-age children; however, there is increasing recognition that younger children are also affected. Clinical manifestations vary from asymptomatic, to severe complicated pneumonia sometimes with extrapulmonary manifestations.

We reviewed the medical records of all MP positive pediatric patients admitted to the Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center. MP positive case was defined if MP polymerase chain reaction was positive from an oropharyngeal swab sent from 2007 to 2017.

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Underlying Diseases and Causative Microorganisms of Recurrent Pneumonia in Children: A 13-Year Study in a University Hospital

By Tuğçe Tural-Kara, Halil Özdemir, Nihan Yıldız, Bilge Aldemir Kocabaş, Tuğba Erat, Aysun Yahşi, Figen Doğu, Ercan Tutar, Erdal İnce, Ergin Çiftçi

Journal of Tropical Pediatrics, June 2019

 

Pneumonia is a significant cause of death for children, particularly those in developing countries. The records of children who were hospitalized because of pneumonia between January 2003 and December 2015 were retrospectively reviewed, and patients who met the recurrent pneumonia criteria were included in this study. During this 13-year period, 1395 patients were hospitalized with pneumonia; of these, 129 (9.2%) met the criteria for recurrent pneumonia. Underlying diseases were detected in 95 (73.6%) patients, with aspiration syndrome (21.7%) being the most common. Rhinovirus (30.5%), adenovirus (17.2%) and respiratory syncytial virus (13.9%) were the most frequent infectious agents. These results demonstrate that underlying diseases can cause recurrent pneumonia in children. Viruses are also commonly seen in recurrent pneumonia. Appropriate treatments should be chosen based on an analysis of the underlying disease, the patient’s clinical condition and the laboratory and radiological data.

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